Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

All You Can Eat Tamago Kake Gohan For 300 Yen!

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/11 Food , , , , , ,

T.K.G. (Raw Egg on Rice)

You know already what’s TKG, right? If not yet, check out my post here about Tamago Kake Gohan.

Two years ago, I saw this TV program featuring a place that serves all you can eat Tamago Kake Gohan for 300 yen (about $3)! Yes, only raw eggs and rice, crazy right?

Crazy indeed, that I decided to go there. It’s actually in the same prefecture where I live now, but it takes about two hours to get there by car. When I arrived, some customers are already waiting outside the place.

Eatery that offers All-You-Can-Eat T.K.G.

The name of the eatery is Shokudou Kamecchi.


Sign of the eatery nearby the parking area
Sign of the eatery nearby the parking area


kamecchi02
In front of the eatery

Kamecchi - Eatery Front

In the eatery, souvenir items and more…

The place is located on the hillside. There is a park and a soccer field nearby. Right beside the eatery is a souvenir area showcasing local products like fresh and pickled vegetables, packs of egg and more. The eatery itself is pretty small. It can only serve less than 20 people at a time, so you need to wait for awhile to have your turn. I wrote my name on the waiting list and waited.

While waiting, I noticed some photos posted on the wall, photos of celebrities and TV personalities that already visited the place and had TKG there.

My name was called and I went inside. They have their own ticket machine where you can pick the menus to order. I gave the ticket to the staff and we were then ushered to our seats. The woman staff asked me the amount of rice I want and soon after that she provided me one egg, a bowl of rice, pickled radish, and miso soup.

Kamecchi - Tamago Kake Gohan set menu

 Tamago Kake Gohan set menu

How it works

The system is simple, just ask the staff for refill of egg and rice as many times as you want. They have three kinds of soy sauce-based sauces with seaweed, spring onions, and shiso. I can’t remember exactly how many eggs I ate but I got full immediately.

Other than the TKG set menu, they also offer five other menus including omelette with their original tomato sauce and sweet rolled omelette.

Take a look at the picture below.


kamecchi09

Right below the nameboard of the eatery, there is a text, in Japanese, that states “This is the place of Tamago Kake Gohan that Kishida Ginkou popularized”. Anything familiar? Well, how about the name “Kishida Ginkou”? He is the person I mentioned in my first TKG post. He’s from Misaki town, where this eatery is also located.

Take the T.K.G. challenge

Want to try all you can eat TKG and find out how many eggs you can eat in one meal? Come and visit Misaki town, they offer not only fresh eggs but also fresh air and relaxing scenery.

Don’t forget to take a souvenir photo of yourself with their huge TKG comic foreground!

Kamecchi's Tamago Kake Gohan Comic Foreground

 Tamago Kake Gohan Comic Foreground

How To Get There

By train

Take a train from Okayama Station on JR Tsuyama Line towards Tsuyama and get off at Kamenoko Station. From the station, it takes about 15-20 minutes of walk to reach the eatery. You will pass the Kamenoko Post Office on the way.

Note: The current price for TKG set menu when I went there was 300 yen. It’s now 350 yen according to their website.

 

References:
Misaki Town Official Website

The following two tabs change content below.

ren

A gaijin in Okayama who enjoys viewing cherry blossom in spring, fireworks in summer, eating grilled sanma (Pacific saury fish) in autumn and oden in winter.

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

Japanese Kit-kat and Crunch

Oyatsu: Japanese snacks between meals (Life is sweet version)

Oyatsu (2) [My oyatsu on another day] “Takenoko no sato” (Land of bamboo shoots) About 150 yen. This one is a sister product of “Kinoko no yama”. (Mountain of mushrooms) “Takenoko” is a chocolate coated cookie. “Kinoko” has a chocolate cap and a cracker stipe. In Japan, “The battle between the Takenoko party and the […]

Read Article

Umeshu mixed with plain soda water

Umeshu: A Japanese Fruit Liqueur

Late May to June – season for making umeshu (plum liqueur) Recently, when I go to the supermarket, I see empty bins, packs of sugar (rock), liqueur packs and ume (Japanese apricot) fruit being displayed near the entrance. Only then I’ve learned that from late May to June is season for unripe ume and so it is […]

Read Article

092648

What Does the Japanese Fox Say – A Look at Foxes in Japanese Folklore and Popular Culture 2

The Japanese fox (Vulpes vulpes), as mentioned in the first part of this feature, is a common topic in Japanese myths and legends. Continuing our discussion about the kitsune, we will feature one of its known ability: human possession. Kitsune’s Human Possession Kitsune is able to possess humans. The word, 狐憑き (kitsunetsuki), literally means the […]

Read Article

kobu-maki (kelp rolls with fish in it)

Osechi: Traditional Japanese New Year’s Food – Meaning

In my previous post about osechi, I mentioned that each dish has its own meaning and significance. You can think of juubako of osechi as a box full of one’s desires or wishes for himself or for his families for the New Year. What dishes and how they are arranged may differ in every region or household. Below […]

Read Article

Box of Kibi-dango

Kibi-dango (Dumpling with millet)

Kibi-dango In “Momotarou”, “Kibi-dango” plays a very important role – bait to attract three animals and seduce them into the battle against “Oni”(Japanese demons). I love “Kibi-dango”, especially the plain one, but if you ask me whether I can fight against somebody like Chuck Norris for it, my answer is “Absolutely no way!!!” The present […]

Read Article

Osechi juubako - laid out

Osechi: Traditional Japanese New Year’s Food

“Shin-nen akemashite omedetou gozaimasu”, Happy New Year to everyone! How did you spend your year end vacation? I guess, everyone is still in their vacation mode. Did you eat osechi during “sanganichi” (三が日)? How was it? Did you know that each dish has its own meaning and significance? For people who are not familiar with osechi, let me […]

Read Article

Japanese hot pot: Sukiyaki

Japanese Hot Pot Dishes

Winter in Japan is getting colder every year. I was able to experience an unexpected heavy snowfall for the first time here in Okayama around this time last year. Eight centimeters of piled-up snow might not be that much compared to other areas but in Okayama it’s a first time in a couple of decades. Speaking […]

Read Article

Peeling mikan

New Year Holidays in Japan : Mikan

Mikan is one of the typical fruits in Japanese winter. When my siblings and I were ever-hungry children, my mother always bought a box with 15 kg (approx. 530 oz, 33 lb) of mikan in winter. We could easily eat up 15 mikan each at one sitting. I suppose the Engel’s coefficient of my family […]

Read Article

kochi10

Tosa Jiro: The Premium Egg

Lunch meal filled with Kochi local produce During our company trip in 2010, we had a lunch in a Japanese restaurant that mainly offers seafood dishes. We were served with extravagant line-up of sashimi, soup with half-piece of a huge lobster, deep-fried shrimps and vegetables, and katsuo tataki (bonito fish where the outer part is grilled in […]

Read Article

kagamimochi

New Year Holidays in Japan: Mochi

Japan is home to different types of cakes and snacks. Every prefecture has their own version of a snack. One of the popular food in Japan especially during the New Year holiday season is mochi or the Japanese rice cake. The following two tabs change content below.BioLatest Posts harorudo Latest posts by harorudo (see all) […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑