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How to Make Your Own Kibi-Dango

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/18 Food , , , , ,

As what we can learn from our previous post about kibi-dango, the kibi-dango we can buy from souvenir stores nowadays is different from the original kibi-dango that uses millet as its main ingredient.

Box of Kibi-dango

The Kibi-dango that you can usually buy as a souvenir in Okayama.

The Kibi-dango

Let’s have a refresher first. Kibi-dango (吉備団子) is the dumpling that is a popular souvenir from the Okayama Prefecture. It got its name from the early Kibi no kuni (Country of Kibi) which in present-day Japan includes the Okayama Prefecture.

JapanMap -kibi-dango-

-Very roughly estimated area of the Old Kibi Kingdam-

On the other hand, the other kibi-dango, which is written as 黍団子 in Japanese means a dumpling (dango) made up of millet (kibi).

KibiKanji

-Kanji for 2 different "Kibi"-

Homemade Kibi-dango Recipes

In this post, we will introduce some homemade kibi-dango recipes.

簡単おやつ☆きびだんご (Simple Snack☆Kibi-dango) by kobayashi-chan

Ingredients:

Glutinous Millet 1 cup

Water 1 cup

Sugar 2 tablespoons

Pinch of salt

Optional Additional Ingredients:

Soybean flour ½ cup

Sugar 1 tablespoon

Pinch of salt

Instructions:

  1. Wash the millet using a colander.
  2. After washing, you can add the optional ingredients depending on your preference.
  3. Put the millet in a bowl or saucepan. Add the 1 cup water.
  4. Bring to a boil with high flame setting.
  5. After boiling, put the lid and simmer for 15 minutes.
  6. After simmering, cook by steam for 5 minutes.
  7. Add sugar and salt to the mixture.
  8. Using a mortar and pestle, knead the mixture.
  9. Mold the mixture into desired sizes.
  10. You can then coat it with soybean flour.
  11. You can now enjoy your kibi-dango!

Author’s Note: If you prefer, you can put red bean paste inside the kibi-dango.  Also, instead of soybean flour, you can use red bean paste as a coating (just like the ohagi) to your kibi-dango.

ohagi

Ohagi. If you coat it with red bean paste, it will look like this one. The difference between an ohagi and the kibi-dango though is that the ohagi uses glutinous rice while the kibi-dango uses millet. (Photo by kuromeri on Flickr)

Here is another homemade recipe. This one has vague measurements on as to how much of an ingredient is needed. It may be understood as it will be according to your preferences.

○きび団子○ (Kibi-dango) by Tomoko Kitchen

Ingredients:

Sticky millet

Read bean paste

Sugar

Water

Soybean flour

Instructions:

  1. In a saucepan, pour the water and the millet. Bring the mixture to a boil.
  2. Lower the heat. With occasional stirring, make sure the millet becomes soft. Simmer until millet fully absorbs the water. If the water dries out before the millet becomes soft, you can add more water.
  3. After that, pour some sugar and mix.
  4. Steam for about 10 minutes.
  5. While waiting, make small balls out of the red bean paste.
  6. Turn off the heat and let it cool for a while.
  7. Make small portions of the millet mixture and put a ball of red bean paste in the middle.
  8. Mold it so that it will totally cover the red bean paste.
  9. Sprinkle soybean flour.
  10. It is now ready to eat.

Author’s Note: The author of the recipe wanted to make a kibi-dango but as the author searched some recipe, it turns out that most of the recipes use joushinko (上新粉, top-grade rice flour made from non-glutinous rice) or komeko (米粉, rice flour). That’s why the author made his own version of easy-to-cook kibi-dango.

kibi dango

A closer look at the kibi-dango. This is the one you can buy in stores so don’t worry if yours doesn’t look like these.(Photo by kssk on Flickr)

 

zenzai

There are many ways to enjoy the kibi-dango You can make zenzai (red azuki bean soup) and add the kibi-dango. (Photo by kimubert on Flickr)

 

Have you tried making a kibi-dango? Share your experience in the comments section below!

Sources:

1.簡単おやつ☆きびだんご. Cookpad.

2. きび団子. Cookpad.

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