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Wasabi Flavored Snacks

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/11 Food , , , , ,

As you may know already, Japan offers a wide variation of snacks. So, it’s not unusual to find snacks with wasabi flavor. And, for those who are into wasabi, just like me, it’s just hard to ignore them.

Wasabi Flavored Snacks in Japan

Here are some of the wasabi snacks that I found at supermarkets and convenience stores in Japan:

Wasabeef (わさビーフ) potato chips from Yamayoshi Seika

Wasabeef - Wasabi-flavored potato chipsWasabeef BIG size

This one is available throughout the year at the price of 120 yen for regular size (60g) and 198 yen for the bigger one (113g). Only domestically grown potatoes are used. Aside from its original flavor, there is also “ume-wasabeef” flavor. “Ume” for Japanese plum.

For those who like to have more punch of wasabi, they also have “Wasabeef HARD” that you can order online with the same prices. You can check it on this link.

Wasabi-chaya (わさび茶屋) from Kasugai

Wasabichaya - Green peas and broad beans wasabi-flavoured snackWasabichaya – wasabi-flavoured green peas and broad beans

Wasabichaya - in small packsGreen peas and soramame (broad beans) packed in small packs

On the left side is a pack of green peas lightly coated with batter and on the right side, soramame mixed with nori (dried seaweed) strips.

With the use of inert gas in packaging, its fresh and fragrant flavor is preserved. Aside from that, its packaging is well-thought-out not only to avoid contents from getting crushed but also for convenient eating, as illustrated in the picture below.

Wasabi-chaya - Convenient way to eat

 

Kaki no Tane (柿の種) from Kameda Seika

Kaki no Tane - KamedaKameda’s Kaki no Tane in wasabi flavor

Take a look at the picture below and guess what’s inside.

Kaki no Tane - Kameda (close up)
Yes, that’s peanut but other than peanuts, what do you see? No idea? That’s “Kaki no tane”. “Kaki” is Japanese persimmon and “tane” means seed. So, it’s Japanese persimmon seed. Well, no, not really. It’s actually made of rice, steamed and kneaded, then cut thinly, baked and coated with soy sauce and other seasonings. It’s named “Kaki no tane” because it somehow resembles the Japanese persimmon seed.

To see how it’s made, here’s a link from their official website showing the entire process. (It’s in Japanese, but you’ll get the idea by looking at the pictures.)

Kameda Seika uses wasabi produced in Azumino City in Nagano Prefecture. The city is known for its largest wasabi farm in Japan.

Price: 192 grams (6 mini-packs) for 278 yen (tax-included)


Wasabi-salt flavor Jagabee potato sticks from Calbee

Last May, Calbee released a new product of their Jagabee lineup – Wasabi-Salt Flavor Jagabee. It’s only available for a limited period, until last July. If you are lucky enough, you might still find it at some supermarkets. I saw it few times even after July.

Jagabee is made of unpeeled potatoes cut into sticks, carefully selected, deep-fried and seasoned with salt (and wasabi for wasabi-salt flavor). Then, it’s packed into paper-cup containers. Here’s a link of the process of making Jagabee.

When I bought a wasabi-salt flavor Jagabee, it was actually my first time to try a Jagabee product. I was really impressed with its quality, plus the mild wasabi flavor, it’s just perfect. A warning though, a cup might not be enough for you.

Price: open

There are still more snack products with wasabi flavor out there in the market. One of them that I’d like to try would be KitKat Wasabi. I haven’t seen it yet in supermarkets. It’s only available in Shizuoka and Kantou region as stated here in their official website. But you can buy it online.

Have you tried any items on the list? Or, have you tried one that’s not on the list? If you did, tell me what you think.

Resources:
Wasabeef – Yamayoshi Seika
Wasabi-chaya – Kasugai Seika
Kaki no Tane – Kameda Seika
Jagabee – Calbee, Inc.

Related post:
Japanese Condiments: Wasabi (Japanese Horseradish) in Tubes
Oyatsu (Japanese Snacks) 1
Oyatsu (Japanese Snacks) 2

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ren

A gaijin in Okayama who enjoys viewing cherry blossom in spring, fireworks in summer, eating grilled sanma (Pacific saury fish) in autumn and oden in winter.

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