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Go Shopping at a 100 Yen Shop

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/14 Others

I’m sure many of those who have been to Japan would agree that one of the places that got them spend money are 100 yen shops. These are shops that sell items that mostly cost 100 yen exclusive of tax. The items range from food to housewares to accessories, or in other words, there’s a wide array of items available.

Everything’s at 100 Yen Shop

100 yen shops (100円ショップ or hyaku-en shoppu in Japanese) are almost everywhere in Japan. You can simply spot them because they have signs outside telling that the goods are 100 yen. Some of the popular 100 yen shops are Daiso, Can-Do, and Seria.

daiso japan

Daiso Japan is one of the largest 100 yen shops in Japan. (Image by Zhao! on Flickr)
According to GaijinPot, the Daiso Japan chain currently operates more than 2,000 stores nationwide, and opens an average of 40 new stores per month. Central Tokyo’s largest 100 yen shop is The Daiso in Harajuku on Takeshita Dori, just a few steps from Harajuku Station. Japan’s largest 100 yen shop is Daiso Giga Machida. It occupies five floors in front of Machida Station (30 minutes, ¥360 from Shinjuku by Odakyu Railways).

Here are some of the items you usually find inside a 100 yen shop:

Kitchen and Dinnerware


Kitchen and Dinnerware. (Image by Abdulla Al Muhairi on Flickr)

Plates, bowls, and other dinner and kitchen wares. Need some new plates for a party? Or Moved to a new house? Kitchen and dinner items are some of the essential items to have. 100 yen shops have them and at affordable prices.

Hardware Tools and Items


Hardware and DIY Tools. (Photo by Nicholas Wang on Flickr)

Want to fix something but you have no tool for it? The shop has also the tools. Small hammers, measuring tapes, wrench of different sizes, and even for fixing watch straps and bands. Your bicycle’s wheel has gone flat? There’s also a wheel repair kit and canned tire inflater.

School Supplies



School supplies and accessories. (Photo by Abdulla Al Muhairi on Flickr)


The shop has also school supplies and not just the usual supplies like paper, pencil and pen but also magnetic boards, pins, stamp holders, and craft materials. Cheap items that could really be a great help sometimes can also be bought here: USB cables, chargers, headphones.

Other Items

There are also items that we may never think that someone could make something like that. These include:


Portable ashtray. (Photo by Adam Fletcher on Flickr)

As a way to reduce cigarette butt littering, 100 yen shops sell portable ashtrays. They also come in different shapes and colors. They are also good souvenirs in case you want to each your friends proper disposal of trash.

What do you think is this for? It is actually a lemon squeezer. I don’t really know how to use this one but I guess you should punch it into the lemon and squeeze its juice.


Banana Cases(Photo by Monica Kaneko on Flickr)

Banana Case, in case you don’t want to spoil your banana inside your bag.

There are many interesting items you can find inside a 100 yen shop. Be careful though, bring only a certain amount of money when going inside of these shops. You may end up buying things you don’t need. 😀

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