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Basic Japanese : Large numbers in Japanese – Thousand and over

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/15 Others , , , , , , ,

Large numbers in Japanese : Thousand to quadrillion

From thousand to quadrillion, the common units you hear in everyday life in Japan including in the news.

As I wrote in the previous post, for digits over ten, “4” is always read as “yon” and “9” as “kyuu”.
“7” is generally “nana”.

For bigger numbers than “ten thousand”, the name of the unit changes every four digits.

Thousands place

Sen

“Thousand” in Japanese is “sen”, pronounced as English “cen” in a word “century”.
Same as “hundred”, it’s the combination of “one to nine number” and “sen” (and lower digit numbers).
However, a few of them are pronounced differently.

  • “1000” is just “sen”.
    We don’t say “ichi-sen”.
  • “3000” becomes “san-zen”.
  • “4000” is “yon-sen”, never “shi-sen”.
  • “7000” is usually “nana-sen”, not “shichi-sen”.
  • “8000” becomes “hassen”.
  • “9000” is “kyuu-sen”, never “ku-sen”.

Ten thousands to ten million

Man

“Ten thousand” in Japanese is “man”.
Similar to English “mun” in “munchy”.
From ten thousand to ten million, this “man” unit is used in Japanese.

For million, hundred digit numbers and “man”.
For ten million, as you can guess, thousands and “man”.

Ten thousands

It’s just “one to nine number” and “man”.
For bigger number units than “sen”, you can not ommit “ichi” (one).
We always say “ichi man” for “ten thousand”.

– Two kanji characters for “man” and “yorozu” (another pronunciation for the characters) –
Yorozu

The middle character in the image above is another Kanji for “man” (or “yorozu”).
It’s (sometimes?) used in the financial deeds.

The Kanji character for “man” can be read as “yorozu”.
“Yorozu” means “very many”, “everything” or “various”.
The word on the right side of the image is Hiragana for “yorozu”.

Ex.)
“Yorozu-ya” : Lit. Ten thousand shop.
A sort of drug store.
A small shop which sells various items like foods, daily necessaries, clothes, etc.

Yorozu-ya

Hundred thousands

The combination of ten digit numbers and the unit.

Ex.)
“100,000” is “jyuu” (ten) and “man”, thus “jyuu man”.
“110,000” is “jyuu-ichi man”.

Million

Hundred digit numbers and “man”.

Ex.)
“1,000,000” is “hyaku man” : “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.

Ten million

Thousand digit numbers and “man”.
The only exception is one million.
You need to say “issen man”.
“Ichi” (one) and “sen” (thousand) together are pronounced as “issen”.

“11,000,000” is “issen hyaku man” : “issen” and “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.
“33,000,000” is “san-zen san-byaku man” : “san-zen” (three thousand) and “san-byaku” (three hundred) and “man”.

Hundred million to hundred billion

Oku

From “100,000,000” to “100,000,000,000”.
The unit is “oku”.
The same as “man”, it’s a combination of “one to thousands” and “oku” and smaller numbers.

Hundred million

Just like other units, it’s “one to nine number” and “oku”.
“Ichi oku” for “100,000,000”.
“110,000,000” is “ichi oku issen man”.

Billion

Ten digit numbers and “oku”.
One billion is “jyuu oku”.
“1,110,000,000” is “jyuu-ichi oku issen man”.

Ten billion

Hundred digit numbers and “oku”.
Ten billion is “hyaku oku”.

Hundred billion

Thousand digit numbers and “oku”.
For one hundred billion, we usually say “sen oku”, not “issen oku”.

Trillion to quadrillion

Chou

From “1,000,000,000,000” to “1,000,000,000,000,000”.
“Chou” is the unit.
From “one to thousands” and “chou”.

  • One trillion is “icchou” : “ichi” (one) and “chou”.
    Eight trillion is “hacchou” : “hachi” (eight) and “chou”.
  • Ten trillion is “jicchou”* : “jyuu” (ten) and “chou”.
    Japanese ten numbers and the unit “chou” together become “jicchou”, so twenty trillion is “ni jicchou” (“ni” (two) and “jicchou”) and thirty trillion is “san jicchou” (“san” (three) and “jicchou”).
    Eleven trillion is “jyuu icchou”.
    * Many people pronounce “jyucchou” for ten trillion in Japanese.
    “Jicchou” is correct as Japanese so far, but “jyucchou” is widely accepted.
  • Hundred trillion is “hyaku chou” (or “hyacchou”).
  • Quadrillion is “sen chou”.

 

Related posts:
#Numbers (1: General one to ten)
(2: Minor one to ten)
(3: Eleven to hundred)

#Japanese Alphabet (1: “Gojyuu-on” and “iroha-uta”)
(2: Out-of-use characters)
(3: First half of “iroha-uta”)
(4: Second half of “iroha-uta”)

#“I” in Japanese (1) (2) (3)

#Japanese honorific titles (1:Formal) (2:Casual) (3:In text) (4:Business titles)

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kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

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