Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

Basic Japanese : Large numbers in Japanese – Thousand and over

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/15 Others , , , , , , ,

Large numbers in Japanese : Thousand to quadrillion

From thousand to quadrillion, the common units you hear in everyday life in Japan including in the news.

As I wrote in the previous post, for digits over ten, “4” is always read as “yon” and “9” as “kyuu”.
“7” is generally “nana”.

For bigger numbers than “ten thousand”, the name of the unit changes every four digits.

Thousands place

Sen

“Thousand” in Japanese is “sen”, pronounced as English “cen” in a word “century”.
Same as “hundred”, it’s the combination of “one to nine number” and “sen” (and lower digit numbers).
However, a few of them are pronounced differently.

  • “1000” is just “sen”.
    We don’t say “ichi-sen”.
  • “3000” becomes “san-zen”.
  • “4000” is “yon-sen”, never “shi-sen”.
  • “7000” is usually “nana-sen”, not “shichi-sen”.
  • “8000” becomes “hassen”.
  • “9000” is “kyuu-sen”, never “ku-sen”.

Ten thousands to ten million

Man

“Ten thousand” in Japanese is “man”.
Similar to English “mun” in “munchy”.
From ten thousand to ten million, this “man” unit is used in Japanese.

For million, hundred digit numbers and “man”.
For ten million, as you can guess, thousands and “man”.

Ten thousands

It’s just “one to nine number” and “man”.
For bigger number units than “sen”, you can not ommit “ichi” (one).
We always say “ichi man” for “ten thousand”.

– Two kanji characters for “man” and “yorozu” (another pronunciation for the characters) –
Yorozu

The middle character in the image above is another Kanji for “man” (or “yorozu”).
It’s (sometimes?) used in the financial deeds.

The Kanji character for “man” can be read as “yorozu”.
“Yorozu” means “very many”, “everything” or “various”.
The word on the right side of the image is Hiragana for “yorozu”.

Ex.)
“Yorozu-ya” : Lit. Ten thousand shop.
A sort of drug store.
A small shop which sells various items like foods, daily necessaries, clothes, etc.

Yorozu-ya

Hundred thousands

The combination of ten digit numbers and the unit.

Ex.)
“100,000” is “jyuu” (ten) and “man”, thus “jyuu man”.
“110,000” is “jyuu-ichi man”.

Million

Hundred digit numbers and “man”.

Ex.)
“1,000,000” is “hyaku man” : “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.

Ten million

Thousand digit numbers and “man”.
The only exception is one million.
You need to say “issen man”.
“Ichi” (one) and “sen” (thousand) together are pronounced as “issen”.

“11,000,000” is “issen hyaku man” : “issen” and “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.
“33,000,000” is “san-zen san-byaku man” : “san-zen” (three thousand) and “san-byaku” (three hundred) and “man”.

Hundred million to hundred billion

Oku

From “100,000,000” to “100,000,000,000”.
The unit is “oku”.
The same as “man”, it’s a combination of “one to thousands” and “oku” and smaller numbers.

Hundred million

Just like other units, it’s “one to nine number” and “oku”.
“Ichi oku” for “100,000,000”.
“110,000,000” is “ichi oku issen man”.

Billion

Ten digit numbers and “oku”.
One billion is “jyuu oku”.
“1,110,000,000” is “jyuu-ichi oku issen man”.

Ten billion

Hundred digit numbers and “oku”.
Ten billion is “hyaku oku”.

Hundred billion

Thousand digit numbers and “oku”.
For one hundred billion, we usually say “sen oku”, not “issen oku”.

Trillion to quadrillion

Chou

From “1,000,000,000,000” to “1,000,000,000,000,000”.
“Chou” is the unit.
From “one to thousands” and “chou”.

  • One trillion is “icchou” : “ichi” (one) and “chou”.
    Eight trillion is “hacchou” : “hachi” (eight) and “chou”.
  • Ten trillion is “jicchou”* : “jyuu” (ten) and “chou”.
    Japanese ten numbers and the unit “chou” together become “jicchou”, so twenty trillion is “ni jicchou” (“ni” (two) and “jicchou”) and thirty trillion is “san jicchou” (“san” (three) and “jicchou”).
    Eleven trillion is “jyuu icchou”.
    * Many people pronounce “jyucchou” for ten trillion in Japanese.
    “Jicchou” is correct as Japanese so far, but “jyucchou” is widely accepted.
  • Hundred trillion is “hyaku chou” (or “hyacchou”).
  • Quadrillion is “sen chou”.

 

Related posts:
#Numbers (1: General one to ten)
(2: Minor one to ten)
(3: Eleven to hundred)

#Japanese Alphabet (1: “Gojyuu-on” and “iroha-uta”)
(2: Out-of-use characters)
(3: First half of “iroha-uta”)
(4: Second half of “iroha-uta”)

#“I” in Japanese (1) (2) (3)

#Japanese honorific titles (1:Formal) (2:Casual) (3:In text) (4:Business titles)

The following two tabs change content below.

kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

Dazaifu 06

Go west : Sugawara no Michizane – Legends

There are mysterious legends around Sugawara no Michizane. Most of them are episodes after he was framed by his political enemy. Michizane and the flying plum tree This legend is very well-known along with the following poem. The night before he left his home in Kyoto, the capital at that time, he composed a poem […]

Read Article

"I" attack

Basic Japanese : How to say “I” in Japanese – Part 1 –

In Japanese, there are many ways to call yourself. Here, I’m trying to explain the differences of each word, but please note they are my own personal impressions and other Japanese may not feel the same way. The word “I” in Japanese Although we have many words for “I”, it is frequently omitted. If you […]

Read Article

Tsukudo shrine

Mystery tour: Taira no Masakado – Part 2 –

Barrier for Masakado? There are seven main shrines (including “Kubi-zuka”) for Masakado. They are said to have been built to seal the powerful spirit of Masakado as well as to make use of it. [1. Torigoe shrine] It is not officially admitted, but this shrine is said to be the place where Masakado’s hand(s?) is […]

Read Article

Akatsuki no Yona

Basic Japanese : Formal Japanese honorific titles

At first, I was going to write about how to say “you” in Japanese, but the most common “you” word is a person’s name usually with suffix like “san”, “kun”, or “chan”. (ex. Hanako-san) This way of calling is used as third person as well. In this post, I’m trying to explain the variants and […]

Read Article

Inogashira park

Japanese urban legends – Part 3 –

“Toshi densetsu” : Japanese urban legends (3) Mary-san (Ms. Mary) A girl had an old Western doll and called it “Mary”. When her family moved to another place, she disposed it because it was old. One night, a telephone rang at her new home. The girl got it, then heard the voice saying, “Hello, I’m […]

Read Article

Jinmen-inu

Japanese urban legends – Part 1 –

“Toshi densetsu” : Japanese urban legends (1) Summer in Japan is ridiculously hot and humid except in some northern areas. So, people enjoy horror stories especially in summer to feel shivering cold. There are many old and new ghost / horror stories in Japan, and I feel it would be nice to introduce some. (It’s […]

Read Article

Aiueo 3

Basic Japanese : Old Japanese Alphabets

Old Japanese Alphabets or Historical Japanese Alphabets The two red characters in “gojyuu-on” and “iroha-uta” are out of use now. Both characters had their own sounds consisting of a consonant and a vowel, but each of them changed into the same sound as a vowel which has a similar sound. Although they couldn’t be distinguished […]

Read Article

On-chuu

Basic Japanese : Japanese honorific titles in text

Many of Japanese honorific titles in text are the same as ones in speech. However, “sama” or “dono” is much more often used in text, especially for address. Maybe it’s because a writer is in the distance. In a letter, use the same title as one in speech. When I write a letter to my […]

Read Article

Capsule Toy Vending Machines (2nd floor)

Visiting a Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Specialty Store

In Japan, you can find capsule toy vending machines or gacha-gacha in Japanese (refers both to the toy and the vending machine) mostly everywhere. It’s usually located near the entrance at supermarkets, restaurants, department stores, and other places. Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Specialty Store in Okayama City Recently, I have learned that there is a gacha-gacha specialty store called […]

Read Article

Kitano Tenman-guu 2

Go west : Tenman-guu to console Michizane

“Kitano Tenman-guu” in Kyoto to console Michizane In 942, Michizane’s spirit showed up before a girl from a poor family in Kyoto and ordered to build a shrine for him in “Ukon no baba” (“hippodrome controlled by the right guard office”), the place where he often visited during his life. Of course she didn’t have […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑