Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

Basic Japanese : Large numbers in Japanese – Thousand and over

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/15 Others , , , , , , ,

Large numbers in Japanese : Thousand to quadrillion

From thousand to quadrillion, the common units you hear in everyday life in Japan including in the news.

As I wrote in the previous post, for digits over ten, “4” is always read as “yon” and “9” as “kyuu”.
“7” is generally “nana”.

For bigger numbers than “ten thousand”, the name of the unit changes every four digits.

Thousands place

Sen

“Thousand” in Japanese is “sen”, pronounced as English “cen” in a word “century”.
Same as “hundred”, it’s the combination of “one to nine number” and “sen” (and lower digit numbers).
However, a few of them are pronounced differently.

  • “1000” is just “sen”.
    We don’t say “ichi-sen”.
  • “3000” becomes “san-zen”.
  • “4000” is “yon-sen”, never “shi-sen”.
  • “7000” is usually “nana-sen”, not “shichi-sen”.
  • “8000” becomes “hassen”.
  • “9000” is “kyuu-sen”, never “ku-sen”.

Ten thousands to ten million

Man

“Ten thousand” in Japanese is “man”.
Similar to English “mun” in “munchy”.
From ten thousand to ten million, this “man” unit is used in Japanese.

For million, hundred digit numbers and “man”.
For ten million, as you can guess, thousands and “man”.

Ten thousands

It’s just “one to nine number” and “man”.
For bigger number units than “sen”, you can not ommit “ichi” (one).
We always say “ichi man” for “ten thousand”.

– Two kanji characters for “man” and “yorozu” (another pronunciation for the characters) –
Yorozu

The middle character in the image above is another Kanji for “man” (or “yorozu”).
It’s (sometimes?) used in the financial deeds.

The Kanji character for “man” can be read as “yorozu”.
“Yorozu” means “very many”, “everything” or “various”.
The word on the right side of the image is Hiragana for “yorozu”.

Ex.)
“Yorozu-ya” : Lit. Ten thousand shop.
A sort of drug store.
A small shop which sells various items like foods, daily necessaries, clothes, etc.

Yorozu-ya

Hundred thousands

The combination of ten digit numbers and the unit.

Ex.)
“100,000” is “jyuu” (ten) and “man”, thus “jyuu man”.
“110,000” is “jyuu-ichi man”.

Million

Hundred digit numbers and “man”.

Ex.)
“1,000,000” is “hyaku man” : “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.

Ten million

Thousand digit numbers and “man”.
The only exception is one million.
You need to say “issen man”.
“Ichi” (one) and “sen” (thousand) together are pronounced as “issen”.

“11,000,000” is “issen hyaku man” : “issen” and “hyaku” (hundred) and “man”.
“33,000,000” is “san-zen san-byaku man” : “san-zen” (three thousand) and “san-byaku” (three hundred) and “man”.

Hundred million to hundred billion

Oku

From “100,000,000” to “100,000,000,000”.
The unit is “oku”.
The same as “man”, it’s a combination of “one to thousands” and “oku” and smaller numbers.

Hundred million

Just like other units, it’s “one to nine number” and “oku”.
“Ichi oku” for “100,000,000”.
“110,000,000” is “ichi oku issen man”.

Billion

Ten digit numbers and “oku”.
One billion is “jyuu oku”.
“1,110,000,000” is “jyuu-ichi oku issen man”.

Ten billion

Hundred digit numbers and “oku”.
Ten billion is “hyaku oku”.

Hundred billion

Thousand digit numbers and “oku”.
For one hundred billion, we usually say “sen oku”, not “issen oku”.

Trillion to quadrillion

Chou

From “1,000,000,000,000” to “1,000,000,000,000,000”.
“Chou” is the unit.
From “one to thousands” and “chou”.

  • One trillion is “icchou” : “ichi” (one) and “chou”.
    Eight trillion is “hacchou” : “hachi” (eight) and “chou”.
  • Ten trillion is “jicchou”* : “jyuu” (ten) and “chou”.
    Japanese ten numbers and the unit “chou” together become “jicchou”, so twenty trillion is “ni jicchou” (“ni” (two) and “jicchou”) and thirty trillion is “san jicchou” (“san” (three) and “jicchou”).
    Eleven trillion is “jyuu icchou”.
    * Many people pronounce “jyucchou” for ten trillion in Japanese.
    “Jicchou” is correct as Japanese so far, but “jyucchou” is widely accepted.
  • Hundred trillion is “hyaku chou” (or “hyacchou”).
  • Quadrillion is “sen chou”.

 

Related posts:
#Numbers (1: General one to ten)
(2: Minor one to ten)
(3: Eleven to hundred)

#Japanese Alphabet (1: “Gojyuu-on” and “iroha-uta”)
(2: Out-of-use characters)
(3: First half of “iroha-uta”)
(4: Second half of “iroha-uta”)

#“I” in Japanese (1) (2) (3)

#Japanese honorific titles (1:Formal) (2:Casual) (3:In text) (4:Business titles)

The following two tabs change content below.

kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

Masakado

Mystery tour: Taira no Masakado – Part 1 –

Roll up for the mystery tour! This one can be categorized as an urban legend as well. Masakado no Kubi-zuka (The burial mound for Masakado’s head)   Quick History Taira no Masakado is said to be one of the Big Three Onryou (vengeful spirit) in Japan. There are some novels about Masakado, and “Teito Monogatari” […]

Read Article

Tsukudo shrine

Mystery tour: Taira no Masakado – Part 2 –

Barrier for Masakado? There are seven main shrines (including “Kubi-zuka”) for Masakado. They are said to have been built to seal the powerful spirit of Masakado as well as to make use of it. [1. Torigoe shrine] It is not officially admitted, but this shrine is said to be the place where Masakado’s hand(s?) is […]

Read Article

Michizane with his poem

Go west : Dazaifu and Sugawara no Michizane

Sugawara no Michizane is the person who is worshipped as god of study at the shrine, “Dazaifu Tenman-guu”. “Sugawara” is the family name and “Michizane” is the first name. He is also well-known as one of the Big Three Onryou (vengeful spirit) in Japan, along with Taira no Masakado and Emperor Sutoku. Life of Sugawara […]

Read Article

Japanese Number List 2

Basic Japanese : Numbers – Minor one to ten in Japanese

One to ten in Japanese 2 In this post, I’m going to write minor version of one to ten in Japanese. I doubt if this is introduced in Japanese textbooks for foreign people. This is still used, but rather rare I guess. Also, it’s less favourable in the formal conversations or texts. Minor ways to […]

Read Article

Red paper, blue paper

Japanese urban legends – Part 2 –

“Toshi densetsu” : Japanese urban legends (2) In this post, there are only two Japanese urban legends. The main topic is a Japanese toilet.   Yume (Dream) A high school girl had a nightmare that she was mangled by a psychopath with his knife on the way home from her school. It was so vivid […]

Read Article

Go-chisou sama!

Basic Japanese : “Go-chisou sama” – Phrase after meal

Go-chisou sama (deshita) This phrase is said after meal. It expresses appreciation to people who prepared or cooked the meal. “Chisou” literally means “running around”. The Kanji character for “chi” means “run fast” or “travel fast on horseback / by car”. The “sou” character means “run”. People used to run around (or ride around on […]

Read Article

"I" attack

Basic Japanese : How to say “I” in Japanese – Part 1 –

In Japanese, there are many ways to call yourself. Here, I’m trying to explain the differences of each word, but please note they are my own personal impressions and other Japanese may not feel the same way. The word “I” in Japanese Although we have many words for “I”, it is frequently omitted. If you […]

Read Article

Lady saying "Arigatou"

Basic Japanese : “Arigatou” – “Thank you” in Japanese

There are several ways of saying “Thank you” in Japanese. In this post, I am going to explain the most common phrase for “Thank you”. Arigatou (gozai masu / mashita) The phrase was derived from “Arigatashi”, which literally means “difficult to be”. The Kanji in “ari” means “there is” or “be (there)”, and another in […]

Read Article

Dazaifu 06

Go west : Sugawara no Michizane – Legends

There are mysterious legends around Sugawara no Michizane. Most of them are episodes after he was framed by his political enemy. Michizane and the flying plum tree This legend is very well-known along with the following poem. The night before he left his home in Kyoto, the capital at that time, he composed a poem […]

Read Article

Aiueo 1

Basic Japanese : Japanese Alphabetical orders – “Gojyuu-on” and “Iroha-uta”

General Info : Japanese Alphabetical orders There are two patterns of Japanese Alphabetical orders. One starts with “A”, “I”, “U”. This is now used at school to learn Japanese Alphabets, Hiragana and Katakana. Known as “Gojyuu-on” (lit. “fifty sounds”). The other starts with “I”, “Ro”, “Ha”. Probably this was more commonly used before. Known as […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑