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Visiting a Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Specialty Store

In Japan, you can find capsule toy vending machines or gacha-gacha in Japanese (refers both to the toy and the vending machine) mostly everywhere. It’s usually located near the entrance at supermarkets, restaurants, department stores, and other places.

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Specialty Store in Okayama City

Recently, I have learned that there is a gacha-gacha specialty store called “Gacha-gacha Museum Yume-koro” in Okayama City. This store does not only offer a huge collection of gacha-gacha items, but also sells vending machines. In their website, you can see their list of vending machines, from new ones to recycled and second-hands. You can even buy empty capsules, coins, keys, display containers, and parts of the machine.

Few weeks ago, I had the chance to visit the place. As expected, there were many children with their parents. This is the front of the store.


Gacha-gacha "Museum" Yume-koro (Capsule Toy Specialty Shop) - Front
Entrance

This store opened in March 2003, located at Imabo, Kita-ku, Okayama City. It is owned by Dream House Co., Ltd. I passed the area many times before but I didn’t notice it at all. The place looks like a huge storage container turned into a store. It’s actually spacious inside. The store has two floors. Boasting its 300 vending machines inside, it showcases wide range of capsule toys from anime characters, animals, plants, even miniature version of appliances like electric fan, and many more.

Inside the Store

First floor

Gacha-gacha "Museum" Yume-koro (Capsule Toy Specialty Shop) - First FloorInside the first floor

Capsule Toy Vending Machines (1st floor)
From anime characters to popular comedian

Button to call for assistance

Gacha-gacha "Museum" Yume-koro (Capsule Toy Specialty Shop) - Help Button
Help button to the rescue

There is a button installed that you can press to call the staff in case you encountered any trouble or if you have questions to ask. You need to come over to the reception window in the first floor, the staff will show up there.

Recycled capsule toy vending machines

Capsule Toy Vending Machines for saleRecycled capsule toy vending machines for sale

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) - Kendama
Very cute! Pocket kendama

Shingeki no Kyojin (Attack on Titan)

Capsule Toy - Shingeki No Kyojin (Attack on Titan)Shingeki no Kyojin (Attack on Titan)

(This one costs 400 yen. The size is bigger and more detailed design.
This is already part 2 of the Shingeki no Kyojin gacha-gacha character series.)

Capsule Toy Vending Machine - Sailor Moon
Nostalgic Sailor Moon
(Lately, I often see more Sailor Moon gacha-gacha on display.
Maybe because of its upcoming come back.)

Some scary and weird items

Capsule Toy Vending Machines - Scary flashlights“Kowai” (Scary) light
(I’m not sure how it works.
It seems that if you turn on the light and point it at the wall for example,
a scary image will appear.)

Capsule Toy Vending Machine - Weird StuffsI don’t think I still need to write what it is, just take a look at the image.

Second floor

Same with the first floor, it is also jam-packed with vending machines. More display for animals, plants, mini cars, sculptures, etc. There is also a table and bench where you can take a seat. 

Gacha-gacha "Museum" Yume-koro (Capsule Toy Specialty Shop) - view from 2nd floor
View from 2nd floor

Capsule Toy Vending Machines (2nd floor)Look at that!

Animal and Plant Capsule Toys

Capsule Toy Vending Machine - Animal collection
Animals and plants line-ups

Capsule Toy Vending Machines - Insects collection
More animal capsule toys

Mascot Characters and more

Capsule Toy display lineup
Capsule toy display on top of the machine
(Are they watching a movie inside the theater?)

Capsule Toy Vending Machines - Unique Characters
“No More Eiga Dorobo (Movie Piracy)” characters

If you have tried watching a movie in the theater here in Japan, you maybe familiar already with these characters. A short movie is usually shown at the start featuring these two characters to discourage movie piracy.

Camera Miniature

Capsule Toy Vending Machines - Olympus Camera miniatureSurprise! Surprise! Olympus Pen camera

I was surprised to see this Olympus Pen camera capsule toy item. I couldn’t help myself but to get one! This one costs 200 yen.

How to operate capsule toy vending machine step-by-step

Enter coins into the slot.

This one costs 200 yen so I need to enter two 100 yen coins.

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Vending Machine - How to operate 1

Turn the knob clockwise until you hear the capsule toy falling down.

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Vending Machine - How to operate 2

Take out the container and get yourself ready to check your “price”!

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Vending Machine - How to operate 3

Twist the container and open up!

 I can’t wait to see what’s inside. (Just ignore the hairy hands :P)

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) Vending Machine - How to operate 4

Throw the empty container to designated bins.

If you don’t want to keep the container, you can leave it in the basket/bin installed nearby.

Gacha-gacha (Capsule Toy) - Olympus Pen camera
Whoa! Same model with my camera! How cool is that?!

In one vending machine, it usually contains selection of items. For example, different characters of Shingeki No Kyojin or different pose of a dog. You don’t know which one of the items you will get. You could get the same item you already have or one of your least favorite. This adds up to the excitement. Also, it’s a good strategy to buy capsule toys together with your friends, so you can exchange items.

Even if you can’t think of anything in particular to buy, just visit and check the items. I’m sure you’ll have fun even by just looking around.

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ren

A gaijin in Okayama who enjoys viewing cherry blossom in spring, fireworks in summer, eating grilled sanma (Pacific saury fish) in autumn and oden in winter.

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