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We are ninjas: Run like a ninja!

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/20 Traditional Culture , ,

Running tips by ninja

It was very important for ninja to run as far as possible and as quick as possible.
There are several know-hows:

 

[Where to look]

When you run a long distance, look at close distance.
This makes you put your chin down.
(If you run with your chin up, it will be difficult to keep regular breath and easy to get tired.)

 

[Umeboshi (pickled “ume” fruits)]

Umeboshi

- Umeboshi -
Photo from Ashinari

“Ume” is Japanese apricot.(Umeshu post)
“Umeboshi” (lit. dried “ume” fruit) is “pickled ume fruit”.
There are mild taste umeboshi now, but you have to choose classic, very sour and salty ones.
Put umeboshi on your navel, then you will get less tired.

 

[Futae ibuki (double breath)]

This is a method of breathing when you run a long distance.
Take a breath in, out, out, in, out, in, in, out.
Continue this regularly while you’re running.

The possible merits of this breathing are:
Enables you to bring more oxygen into your body. (No physiological rationale)
You would feel less tired because you would concentrate on breathing.

I tried this when I went to my office by bicycle for about 20 minutes, and I’m not sure if it’s effective.
Maybe I should try it for a much longer distance, but I’m too lazy to do that.

 

Running training

[Using “kasa”, a Japanese straw hat]

Ladies wearing "kasa"

- Ladies wearing "kasa" -
Photo from PhotoAC

Put “kasa” (Japanese straw hat to avoid rain or sunlight in this case) on your chest and run steadily without dropping it to the ground.

 

[Using a long cloth]

I read this training in a children’s book called “Secrets of Ninja”.
Tie a long cloth around your waist.
I can’t remember how long the cloth should be.
At least it should be long enough to droop on the floor.
You have to run at a certain speed so that the cloth doesn’t touch the ground.

Running training using a long cloth

 

[Using wet papers]

Also from my memory of the book, “Secrets of Ninja”.
Arrange wet papers on the floor, and walk quickly on them without tearing or dislocating any of them.

Run on wet papers

 

Running methods

Maybe not really “running”, but all of these methods have the word “running” on its names.

 

[Yoko-bashiri (Sideways running)]

Walking sideways with your back against the wall.
Outstretch your arms and legs, then cross your arms and legs.
Repeat this movement.
When you place your foot, start from toes or the small toe not to make a noise.
You can move with a bigger stride than usual, so you can go forward more quickly.

Yoko-bashiri

 

[Inu-bashiri (Dog running)]

Dog

Original photo from PAKUTASO

Moving around on your hands and feet when you have no space to stand up like in the attic or under the floor.

Inu-bashiri

- Hand and foot for "Inu-bashiri" -

Note:
There is a space under the floor for a traditional Japanese house.
The usual height between the ground and the floor is more than 45 cm (around 1.5 ft), so there is enough space to hide and move around.

Cat under the floor

- Cat under the floor -
Photo from Ashinari

 

[Kitsune-bashiri (Fox running)]

Fox

Original photo from PAKUTASO
About fox, see this post.

Almost the same with “Inu-bashiri”.
Moving around on your fingertips and tiptoes in the narrow space.
Quieter than “Inu-bashiri”.

Kitsune-bashiri

- Hand and foot for "Kitsune-bashiri" -

 

“Ga” no michi (Pathway of “Ga”)

If you have seen the names of “Iga” and “Kouka” (famous ninja-related places) in Kanji characters, you probably have noticed the common character.
There are several spots which have (had) the character around the area, and there was a secret pathway to connect them between Saika in Wakayama and Kaga in Ishikawa.

Pathway of "GA"

Pathway of "GA"

All names contain the same Kanji character. (Red coloured)

It seemed it was originally for “Shugenjya” or “Yamabushi” (ascentic monks who train in mountains), but ninja also used it.
The precise route is not known.

Note:
“Naga” town, No. 6 on the map, and four other towns were merged to form the city of “Kinokawa” in 2005.

 

Related posts:
#The word “ninja”
#What is “ninja”?
#Walk like a ninja!

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kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

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