Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

The “Gentle Way” of Judo – Competitive Judo

As noted in the history of judo, it was primarily made or developed by Jigoro Kano as a self-defense. As years passed by, it was expected for judokas to test their skills against each other. Thus, competitive judo began.

History of Competitive Judo

Competitive judo is a vital aspect of judo. It is where judokas test their skills against the abilities of others of their own weight, age, and skill level.

The All-Japan Judo Championships (全日本柔道選手権大会 Zennihon jūdō senshuken taikai) were first held in 1930 and have been held every year, with the exception of the wartime period between 1941 and 1948, and continue to be the highest profile tournament in Japan. Judo’s international profile was boosted by the introduction of the World Judo Championships in 1956. The championships were initially a fairly small affair, with 31 athletes attending from 21 countries in the first year.

The first time judo was seen in the Olympic Games was in an informal demonstration hosted by Kano at the 1932 Games. Judo then became an Olympic sport starting the 1964 games in Tokyo. The Olympic Committee initially dropped judo for the 1968 Olympics, meeting protests. The first winner was Dutchman Anton Geesink l in the open division of judo who defeated Akio Kaminaga of Japan. The women’s event was introduced at the Olympics in 1988 as a demonstration event, and an official medal event in 1992. Paralympic judo has been a Paralympic sport since 1988; it is also one of the sports at the Special Olympics.

Contest Rules

Weight Divisions

Men Women
Under 60 kg Under 48 kg
60–66 kg 48–52 kg
66–73 kg 52–57 kg
73–81 kg 57–63 kg
81–90 kg 63–70 kg
90–100 kg 70–78 kg
Over 100 kg Over 78 kg

Scoring

In a Judo competition, the objective is to score an ippon (one full pint). Scores can be earned by the following:

  • Ippon (full point)
    • Executing a skillful throwing technique which results in one contestant being thrown largely on the back with considerable force or speed.
    • Maintaining a pin for 25 seconds.
    • One contestant cannot continue and gives up.
    • One contestant is disqualified for violating the rules (hansoku-make).
    • Applying an effective armbar or an effective stranglehold
  • Waza-ari (almost ippon, half point)
    • a throwing technique that is not quite an ippon (for example the opponent lands only partly on the back, or with less force than required for ippon)
    • holding one contestant in a pin for 20 seconds
    • when the opponent violates the rules (shido) three times
  • Yuko (almost waza-ari)
    • A throw that places the opponent onto his side

No amount of yukos equal a waza-ari, they are only considered in the event of an otherwise tied contest.

 

References:

1. Judo. Wikipedia.

2. Tournament Guide. JudoInfo Online Dojo.

3. Featured Image from AC-Illust

The following two tabs change content below.

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

Date Masamune Tanbo Art

Amazing Rice Paddy Art in Inakadate

People make art almost everywhere: canvasses, walls, streets, and rice fields. Wait, rice fields? Yes, you read it right. Rice paddy art or known as Tanbo art (田んぼアート) in Japan is the best thing to happen to rice fields before the rice are harvested and served on our plates. Inakadate, Aomori Inakadate is a village […]

Read Article

IMG_0312

Omihachiman and the man named William Merrell Vories – Part 1

Every time I visit Japan for work, one of the many highlights I look forward during my stay is to get to travel with my Japanese language teacher – I fondly call her sensei. We have traveled together to so many different tourist destinations around Kyoto and Okayama. Having her as a travel buddy is […]

Read Article

go_19x19

Let’s Play “Go”! – Terms and Strategies

In our previous posts about Go, we learned that Go is a game which originated in China (Go History) and we also learned its basic rules (Go Rules). In this post, we will learn about strategies and other terms in Go. The following two tabs change content below.BioLatest Posts harorudo Latest posts by harorudo (see […]

Read Article

Hinoe uma

Jyuuni-shi : Chinese Zodiac in Japan -Part 1- (For age and year)

Jyuuni-shi : Chinese Zodiac in Japan The word “Eto” means a combination of the ten Celestial and the Chinese Zodiac, but in Japan it is quite often used to refer only to Zodiac. “Jyuuni-shi” is the correct word for the Chinese Zodiac. …Hey, I didn’t know that! I had believed “Eto” meant the same as […]

Read Article

kendo target areas

Kendo, The Way of The Sword – Kendo Practices

In our previous posts, we learned about the history and equipment used in kendo. In this post, we will learned about kendo practices. It’s estimated that somewhere around 14 million people world-wide are Kendokas, or active practitioners and students of Kendo. Unlike almost every other martial art, Kendo has one global federation, and every country […]

Read Article

10933010884_bef367e053_z

Kendo, The Way of the Sword – History

Kendo, or the “way of the sword,” is similar to forms of fencing seen in other lands. Two contestants wearing armor to protect the face, chest, and arms confront each other with bamboo swords called shinai. Today, it is widely practiced within Japan and many other nations across the world. The following two tabs change […]

Read Article

12373664483_237f540c51_m

New Year Holidays in Japan: Japanese Traditional Games

As kids, we all played games and while living in Japan I wondered what sort of games do kids here play. Were the games they played similar to the games I used to play growing up back home? Do they also roll over the dirt, enjoy playing catch or maybe play hide and seek? Or […]

Read Article

4881450065_fe7f37024d_z

Playing with Flowers in Cards: Hanafuda 2

As we learned in our first post about Hanafuda (花札), they are Japanese playing cards that are used to play a number of games. The name comes from two Japanese words hana (花) which means flowers and fuda (札) which can mean cards. Some call it “flower cards” in English. In this post, we will […]

Read Article

Castle

Takahashi in Okayama, Japan -Part 1-

If you go to the Fukiya village by public transport, you need to go to Takahashi, which is also a lovely place to visit. There are old samurai residences, a temple with Japanese garden, and above all, a castle on the mountain. The name of the city is “Takahashi”, but the train station is “Bicchuu […]

Read Article

buddha -mt-shirataki-

Mt. Shirataki and the Love Rock

I thought we already reached our destination after losing liters of sweat pushing our bicycles and ourselves following the steep road going up to the mountain. I was wrong. We just reached the wide parking area and there we were still half way from the top. But even so, the scenery from there was already very […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑