Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

The “Gentle Way” of Judo – Competitive Judo

As noted in the history of judo, it was primarily made or developed by Jigoro Kano as a self-defense. As years passed by, it was expected for judokas to test their skills against each other. Thus, competitive judo began.

History of Competitive Judo

Competitive judo is a vital aspect of judo. It is where judokas test their skills against the abilities of others of their own weight, age, and skill level.

The All-Japan Judo Championships (全日本柔道選手権大会 Zennihon jūdō senshuken taikai) were first held in 1930 and have been held every year, with the exception of the wartime period between 1941 and 1948, and continue to be the highest profile tournament in Japan. Judo’s international profile was boosted by the introduction of the World Judo Championships in 1956. The championships were initially a fairly small affair, with 31 athletes attending from 21 countries in the first year.

The first time judo was seen in the Olympic Games was in an informal demonstration hosted by Kano at the 1932 Games. Judo then became an Olympic sport starting the 1964 games in Tokyo. The Olympic Committee initially dropped judo for the 1968 Olympics, meeting protests. The first winner was Dutchman Anton Geesink l in the open division of judo who defeated Akio Kaminaga of Japan. The women’s event was introduced at the Olympics in 1988 as a demonstration event, and an official medal event in 1992. Paralympic judo has been a Paralympic sport since 1988; it is also one of the sports at the Special Olympics.

Contest Rules

Weight Divisions

Men Women
Under 60 kg Under 48 kg
60–66 kg 48–52 kg
66–73 kg 52–57 kg
73–81 kg 57–63 kg
81–90 kg 63–70 kg
90–100 kg 70–78 kg
Over 100 kg Over 78 kg

Scoring

In a Judo competition, the objective is to score an ippon (one full pint). Scores can be earned by the following:

  • Ippon (full point)
    • Executing a skillful throwing technique which results in one contestant being thrown largely on the back with considerable force or speed.
    • Maintaining a pin for 25 seconds.
    • One contestant cannot continue and gives up.
    • One contestant is disqualified for violating the rules (hansoku-make).
    • Applying an effective armbar or an effective stranglehold
  • Waza-ari (almost ippon, half point)
    • a throwing technique that is not quite an ippon (for example the opponent lands only partly on the back, or with less force than required for ippon)
    • holding one contestant in a pin for 20 seconds
    • when the opponent violates the rules (shido) three times
  • Yuko (almost waza-ari)
    • A throw that places the opponent onto his side

No amount of yukos equal a waza-ari, they are only considered in the event of an otherwise tied contest.

 

References:

1. Judo. Wikipedia.

2. Tournament Guide. JudoInfo Online Dojo.

3. Featured Image from AC-Illust

The following two tabs change content below.

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

Wrong kunoich

We are ninjas: The word “ninja”

When I was a child, “ninja” was not known worldwide like today. Of course it was very popular in Japan, but famous ninja anime / manga (“Sasuke” and “Kamui” by Sanpei Shirato were probably the best-known at that time) were for rather adults than kids to compare with the present “Nintama Rantarou” or “Naruto”, although […]

Read Article

Japanese tally five

Counting: Japanese tally and gesture

The “Correct” counting method in Japan How do you write when you count numbers of items? I know tally marks which are used in many countries, but Japanese people don’t use them. Instead, a certain Kanji character is used. The character means “correct”. As you can see, this consists of five lines. On counting, it […]

Read Article

Japanese old hour system

Jyuuni-shi : Chinese Zodiac in Japan -Part 2- (For hour)

Japansese old hour system and “Jyuuni-shi” In the old times, “Jyuuni-shi” was more commonly used, for directions, dates and hours. In addition, Japanese hour system was totally different from the present one. Now those customs are gone, but you can find the traces of them in some words.   [The word “oyatsu”] If you have […]

Read Article

Chinowa featured image

Summer Ritual at Shinto Shrine: “Chinowa-kuguri”

When I visited my wife’s parents’ home, I also went to a nearby shrine called Kibitsu shrine. At that time, an interesting ritual was being held. I’m going to introduce about it on this post. “Chinowa-kuguri” The ritual that has been held there is called “Chinowa-kuguri”. “Chinowa-kuguri” is one of the rites of “Nagoshi-no-harae”, which […]

Read Article

20141108_122440

Shimanami Kaido : Beyond the cycling routes

At this years company excursion, we traveled down south to Seto Inland Sea. Located in between Imabari, Ehime and Onomichi, Hiroshima. It took us about three hours to reach the port of Shitadami where we boarded a small cruise vessel to experience the Rapid Tides of the Kurushima Strait. Before the cruise started, the cruise […]

Read Article

Shiba

Japanese dog as a spiritual being

Dog in Japan One of the very popular animals in Japanese old tales. As long as I remember, usually drawn as a white medium-size Japanese dog in a book, with a curled tail and erect, triangular ears like a Kishu dog. The dogs are always loyal, take the good men’s side. I can’t remember any […]

Read Article

A couple enjoying the view at Ginshoji

Momijigari: Hunting for Autumn Colors

I have never been to any form of hunting trip till my friends and I head out to Kyoto this year to experience Momijigari which literally translates to maple leaf (momiji) hunting (gari). Just like Hanami (sakura viewing) in spring, Momijigari in autumn is well rooted in the Japanese culture and recently has also gained […]

Read Article

kagamimochi

New Year Holidays in Japan: Mochi

Japan is home to different types of cakes and snacks. Every prefecture has their own version of a snack. One of the popular food in Japan especially during the New Year holiday season is mochi or the Japanese rice cake. The following two tabs change content below.BioLatest Posts harorudo Latest posts by harorudo (see all) […]

Read Article

vacation

Golden Week – Furikae Kyūjitsu and Golden Week History

Today is the last day of the Golden Week this year in Japan. For this year, this day has no particular celebration or holiday. Today is just a Compensation/Substitute Holiday (振替休日 Furikae Kyūjitsu) that is observed when any of the Golden Week holidays fall on Sunday. Past Observances of Furikae Kyūjitsu Furikae Kyūjitsu of the […]

Read Article

mikan

Gaijin Chronicles : Mikan and Japanese Gift Giving Etiquette

Early autumn of 2012, my friends and I went to Kuroisan Green Park in Setouchi-shi, Okayama for mikan harvesting.  Mikan, according to its Wikipedia entry, is a sweet,  seedless,  and easy-peeling citrus species about the size of mandarin oranges but smaller than an orange. For a fee of 700 yen, we were led to the orchard […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑