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Going Green: Maishima Incineration Plant

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/12 Travel & View point , ,

Maishima Incineration Plant

Maishima Incineration Plant’ scaled model

Can you guess what this building is? I guess most people would guess that it’s a theme park being so closely located to Universal Studios Japan. Don’t worry you’re not the only one deceived by how it looks. Many tourist and locals alike in the city of Osaka mistake this building as a theme park or a mall of some sort because of how it looks. But you will be very amazed as to what its purpose is. This building is called the Maishima Incineration Plant.

Maishima Incineration Plant

Exterior of the Maishima Incineration Plant the windows shown here in its facade are not all real, some of them where just placed there as part of the designed envisioned by Master Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

History of the Maishima Incineration Plant

According to our tour guide, this plant was conceptualized during the time when Osaka was bidding to host the 2008 Olympics. Its unique exterior was designed by world-renowned Viennese artist Master Friedensreich Hundertwasser. The tour guide told us that Mr. Hundertwasser designed the exterior with the concept of harmonizing technology, ecology and art. And that because straight lines do not exist in nature, Mr. Hundertwasser used curved lines into his design with these three colors green as a symbol of harmony with nature, red and yellow stripes represent the combustion flames.


Maishima Incineration Plant Tower – did you know that the plants employees have to go up to this tower through a spiral stair case just to change the light of this tower?

Plant Capacity

Completed in April of 2001, this plant is owned by the City of Osaka. Capable of processing 900 tons of garbage per day and whose operation is only shut down 3 weeks per year for maintenance. But did you know that besides incinerating garbage this plant is also capable of producing its own power through the garbage it incinerate per day. With 900 tons capacity per day, this facility can generate more power that the plant can use and thus has enabled the incineration plant to sell its surplus electricity giving it additional income and additional social value to the city. Staying true to its vision of being one with nature, the plant has also its very own Rain catcher. Water collected from rain is stored in tanks and it is used by the plant effectively. To power its incinerator the plant uses the gas it collects from the waste pit by drawing it into the incinerator as combustion air.

Waste pit

Tons of Garbage inside the waste pit ready to be processed.

If your interested in touring the plant, call the plant before hand and make a reservation a week before your scheduled tour. The Plant is open daily except on Sundays and National Holidays. The plant does not allow walk-in visitors. The tour of the entire plant would take about 90 minutes.  Don’t worry if your afraid you will be touring a stinky facility you will be surprised to find out that there is no garbage smell inside the facility. It is completely clean.

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  1. […] during the time when Osaka was bidding to host the 2008 Olympics.” According to a tour guide, “Mr. Hundertwasser designed the exterior with the concept of harmonizing technology, ecology […]

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