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A Weekend in Nagasaki 2 – What to Eat in Nagasaki

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/18 Food, Travel & View point , , ,

A trip however short or long it may be won’t be complete if you can’t sample the taste of the local food of the place you’re visiting. While in Nagasaki, we made it a point to sample their local dishes and delicacies.

Local Version of Dishes We Ate in Nagasaki

Champon. On top of Nagasaki’s famed local offerings is the champon. It is a noodle dish with origins from China. It is just like any other noodle dish such as ramen but its cooking method is different. With ramen you cook the noodle separately and then combine the noodle and broth when its ready to be served. However champon is made by first frying pork, and other ingredients like seafood in lard and then adding broth with chicken or pork bone stock into it.  After which the noodle is then added to it.

The warmth of the broth really helped fight off the cold from the wind and rain when we went to Mt. Inasa. We dined at the restaurant just below the observation platform where it also offers a limited view of Nagasaki’s Million Dollar Nigh View from its glass windows.

I’m allergic to crustaceans (bummer, right? ) so I asked the waitstaff to remove those when they prepared my order. Despite the removal of some ingredients, I still found the dish very tasty and filling.

CastellaThis is a variety of sponge cake introduced by the Portuguese and has since been adapted to suit the Japanese taste. We bought a lot of these for omiyage.

Shippoku ryoriLike the champon, Shippoku cuisine also has roots from China. Though the dishes and delicacies in this spread is already a combination of Chinese, European, and Japanese. What sets this apart is that the dishes are set on a circular table and it promotes jikabashi (taking of food directly from a communal dish using one’s own chopsticks), which is typically a big no no in Japanese dining etiquette.


(Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Sara UdonAnother native Nagasaki noodle dish. The noodle is fried until crispy then topped with vegetables, seafood, pork and other ingredients in a thick sauce.

Guzouni. This is a soup made from vegetables, meat, fish and mochi. This would be a nice dish to try making when you have lots of mochi left over from the New Year.


(Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

These are just a few of the culinary treats Nagasaki has to offer. With those variety of noodle dishes, it surely is a treat for noodle lovers.

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