Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

Due South : Zentsuu-ji, Kagawa – Quick Shikoku Pilgrimage

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/05 Traditional Culture, Travel & View point , , , , , ,

Mini hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri (Quick circuit for 88 sacred places)

Zentsuu-ji 08

Behind the temple, there is a small mountain called “Koushiki-zan” (lit. “Mt. Scent-colour”).
There is a path encircling the mountain, which is about 1.6 km (approx. 1 mile) long.
This is a very short version of the well-known pilgrimage in Japan : “(Shikoku) Hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri” (lit. “Visiting around eighty-eight places”) or “Ohenro” (lit. “Covering all the route”).
“Pilgrimage” is “Jyunrei” in Japanese, so it is often referred as “Shikoku Jyunrei” too.
It is said that this short route was established in the late Edo era.

Zentsuu-ji 07

The route starts from the temple called “Gochi-in”.
Stone statues, carved in the Edo period, are placed on the sides of the pathway, and eighty-eight of them represent a respective temple.

There seemed to be a stamp card to record the dates of your pilgrimage, but I’m not sure if there still is.
I didn’t do nothing special, just walked along the path.

This sort of “shortcut” pilgrimages can be seen throughout Japan.

 

O-suna fumi (lit. “Setting foot on the sand”)

“O-suna fumi” is a certain type of shortcuts for eighty-eight places.
Collect the sand from all the temples and put it in one place (this doesn’t mean that the sand will be mixed), and people walk on it.

Originally, the sand from eighty-eight places was put into 88 places burlap bags, and placed in front of 88 hanging scrolls which the main gods of the temples were drawn.
People set foot on these bags one by one, with praying to each god, so that they could finish their pilgrimage without going around Shikoku Island.

Many of shortcut 88-site pilgrimages are this “o-suna fumi”, but I don’t know whether the “mini” one in Zentsuu-ji is “o-suna fumi” as well.
Maybe the sand from each temple is buried in the ground in front of the respective statue.

In the Zentsuu-ji temple, there is a place for “o-suna fumi” (Japanese website).

 

Hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri

Zentsuu-ji 05

You can see pilgrims who are wearing white clothes and straw hats in the photo.
Items for Shikoku Pilgrimage (Japanese website)

The proper version of the Shikoku Pilgrimage.
All the 88 temples are said to be where Kuukai performed various Buddhist practices.
There is a legend about the beginning of the pilgrimage:

In the Ehime prefecture of Shikoku Island, there was a very rich man called “Emon-Saburou”, who was known to be quite greedy and ruthless.

One day, a miserable-looking Buddhist monk came to his house to ask for alms.
(It’s one of Buddhist practices, known as “takuhatsu”.)
He succeeded to get rid of the monk with violence.
After the incident, his eight children died one after another.

When he found out that the monk was Kuukai, he regretted his crucial deeds (not only to Kuukai) and decided to go around temples in search for the monk to be forgiven…

It is said that this is how the Shikoku Pilgrimage route was established.

For the map of 88 temples, see here (Japanese website by a travel agency).

Zentsuu-ji 09

- A cat in Zentsuu-ji -
Lovely!

 

Related posts:
#Zentsuu-ji(1: General Info and Kuukai)
(2: The temple and around)

#Konpira(1) (2) (3) (4)

#Kotohira City

The following two tabs change content below.

kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • 1 follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

20141011_123524

Omihachiman and the man named William Merrell Vories – Part 2

Where is Omihachiman? Omihachiman is located on the eastern shore of Lake Biwa – the largest lake in Japan. According to wikipedia Omihachiman means “Hachiman in Omi”. Since the Edo Period Omihachiman has been known to be a merchants town and is now widely known to be the birthplace of ‘Omi-shonin’ – the merchants from […]

Read Article

IMG_0146

Going Green: Maishima Incineration Plant

Can you guess what this building is? I guess most people would guess that it’s a theme park being so closely located to Universal Studios Japan. Don’t worry you’re not the only one deceived by how it looks. Many tourist and locals alike in the city of Osaka mistake this building as a theme park […]

Read Article

Shiba

Japanese dog as a spiritual being

Dog in Japan One of the very popular animals in Japanese old tales. As long as I remember, usually drawn as a white medium-size Japanese dog in a book, with a curled tail and erect, triangular ears like a Kishu dog. The dogs are always loyal, take the good men’s side. I can’t remember any […]

Read Article

kendo target areas

Kendo, The Way of The Sword – Kendo Practices

In our previous posts, we learned about the history and equipment used in kendo. In this post, we will learned about kendo practices. It’s estimated that somewhere around 14 million people world-wide are Kendokas, or active practitioners and students of Kendo. Unlike almost every other martial art, Kendo has one global federation, and every country […]

Read Article

hanafuda

Playing with Flowers in Cards: Hanafuda

Hanafuda (花札) are Japanese playing cards that are used to play a number of games. The name comes from two Japanese words hana (花) which means flowers and fuda (札) which can mean cards. Some call it “flower cards” in English. The name also refers to games played with those cards. The following two tabs […]

Read Article

real life tanuki

Are you okay, Tanuki? – The Japanese Raccoon Dog in Legends and Popular Culture

Last time, we talked about the sly kitsune or the Japanese fox. In this post, we will feature another animal that is popular in Japanese legends and myths and just like the kitsune, is sometimes depicted as a trickster, the tanuki or the Japanese raccoon dog. Tanuki, Not Your Ordinary Raccoon Though they look like […]

Read Article

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Monjyayaki in Tsukishima

On my first visit to Tokyo we visited Tsukishima district famous for monjyayaki – it is so famous that there is a street filled with stores that serve this famous kanto specialty. So what exactly is monjyayaki or monjya as it is popularly known. Monjyayaki or simple monjya is a type of Japanese pancake made […]

Read Article

092648

What Does the Japanese Fox Say – A Look at Foxes in Japanese Folklore and Popular Culture 2

The Japanese fox (Vulpes vulpes), as mentioned in the first part of this feature, is a common topic in Japanese myths and legends. Continuing our discussion about the kitsune, we will feature one of its known ability: human possession. Kitsune’s Human Possession Kitsune is able to possess humans. The word, 狐憑き (kitsunetsuki), literally means the […]

Read Article

midori no hi

Golden Week – Constitution Memorial Day and Greenery Day

Continuing our feature about Japan’s Golden Week, this post will feature the second and third holidays, the Constitution Memorial Day and Greenery Day. Constitution Memorial Day The Constitution Memorial Day, or Kenpō Kinenbi (憲法記念日) as it is known in Japan, is a national holiday in Japan that is celebrated every May 3. The date signifies […]

Read Article

Shinai

Kendo, The Way of The Sword – Kendo Rules

As the concept of kendo states that kendo is to discipline the human character through the application of the principle of the katana, there are kendo rules and regulations followed in a match (or in Japanese 試合, shiai). Kendo Match Rules A kendo match is herein defined as a contest between two contestants for a […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑