Quest For Japan Logo-Ver7

Due South : Zentsuu-ji, Kagawa – Quick Shikoku Pilgrimage

Date Published: Last Update:2015/05/05 Traditional Culture, Travel & View point , , , , , ,

Mini hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri (Quick circuit for 88 sacred places)

Zentsuu-ji 08

Behind the temple, there is a small mountain called “Koushiki-zan” (lit. “Mt. Scent-colour”).
There is a path encircling the mountain, which is about 1.6 km (approx. 1 mile) long.
This is a very short version of the well-known pilgrimage in Japan : “(Shikoku) Hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri” (lit. “Visiting around eighty-eight places”) or “Ohenro” (lit. “Covering all the route”).
“Pilgrimage” is “Jyunrei” in Japanese, so it is often referred as “Shikoku Jyunrei” too.
It is said that this short route was established in the late Edo era.

Zentsuu-ji 07

The route starts from the temple called “Gochi-in”.
Stone statues, carved in the Edo period, are placed on the sides of the pathway, and eighty-eight of them represent a respective temple.

There seemed to be a stamp card to record the dates of your pilgrimage, but I’m not sure if there still is.
I didn’t do nothing special, just walked along the path.

This sort of “shortcut” pilgrimages can be seen throughout Japan.

 

O-suna fumi (lit. “Setting foot on the sand”)

“O-suna fumi” is a certain type of shortcuts for eighty-eight places.
Collect the sand from all the temples and put it in one place (this doesn’t mean that the sand will be mixed), and people walk on it.

Originally, the sand from eighty-eight places was put into 88 places burlap bags, and placed in front of 88 hanging scrolls which the main gods of the temples were drawn.
People set foot on these bags one by one, with praying to each god, so that they could finish their pilgrimage without going around Shikoku Island.

Many of shortcut 88-site pilgrimages are this “o-suna fumi”, but I don’t know whether the “mini” one in Zentsuu-ji is “o-suna fumi” as well.
Maybe the sand from each temple is buried in the ground in front of the respective statue.

In the Zentsuu-ji temple, there is a place for “o-suna fumi” (Japanese website).

 

Hachi-jyuu-hachi kasho meguri

Zentsuu-ji 05

You can see pilgrims who are wearing white clothes and straw hats in the photo.
Items for Shikoku Pilgrimage (Japanese website)

The proper version of the Shikoku Pilgrimage.
All the 88 temples are said to be where Kuukai performed various Buddhist practices.
There is a legend about the beginning of the pilgrimage:

In the Ehime prefecture of Shikoku Island, there was a very rich man called “Emon-Saburou”, who was known to be quite greedy and ruthless.

One day, a miserable-looking Buddhist monk came to his house to ask for alms.
(It’s one of Buddhist practices, known as “takuhatsu”.)
He succeeded to get rid of the monk with violence.
After the incident, his eight children died one after another.

When he found out that the monk was Kuukai, he regretted his crucial deeds (not only to Kuukai) and decided to go around temples in search for the monk to be forgiven…

It is said that this is how the Shikoku Pilgrimage route was established.

For the map of 88 temples, see here (Japanese website by a travel agency).

Zentsuu-ji 09

- A cat in Zentsuu-ji -
Lovely!

 

Related posts:
#Zentsuu-ji(1: General Info and Kuukai)
(2: The temple and around)

#Konpira(1) (2) (3) (4)

#Kotohira City

The following two tabs change content below.

kara

A Japanese living in Okayama. A proud "Otaku"! Loves animals, snacks, manga, games (PC, iPad, Nintendo DS, PSP), foreign TV dramas, traveling and football (soccer).

Sponsored Links

  • Pocket
  • follow us in feedly

Related Article/s:

sumo heya (2)

Sumo: More Than Just a Martial Art – The Sumo Wrestler

As sumo has its roots from a religious background (originally performed to entertain Shinto deities), sumo wrestlers lead a highly regimented way of life. The following two tabs change content below.BioLatest Posts harorudo Latest posts by harorudo (see all) Kaomoji: Expressing Emotions Through Text 2 – June 3, 2015 Kaomoji: Expressing Emotions Through Text – […]

Read Article

hanafuda

Playing with Flowers in Cards: Hanafuda

Hanafuda (花札) are Japanese playing cards that are used to play a number of games. The name comes from two Japanese words hana (花) which means flowers and fuda (札) which can mean cards. Some call it “flower cards” in English. The name also refers to games played with those cards. The following two tabs […]

Read Article

Pathway of "GA"

We are ninjas: Run like a ninja!

Running tips by ninja It was very important for ninja to run as far as possible and as quick as possible. There are several know-hows:   [Where to look] When you run a long distance, look at close distance. This makes you put your chin down. (If you run with your chin up, it will […]

Read Article

Konbini (7-eleven)

I Love Konbini: Awesome Konbini (Convenience Store) In Japan!

I love konbini (convenience store) in Japan and I often use it in different situations, for lunch, after work, family trips, and so on. What’s so awesome about it? Well, it’s amazingly convenient, food is delicious, and so much more! This time, I’ll be introducing some of them.   1. It’s Everywhere! As of August […]

Read Article

089508

Keirou no Hi or Respect for the Aged Day

Today is a special day for the elderly in Japan. Special in the sense that the government really made a holiday to celebrate and pay homage to them. People across the country travel to their hometown to visit their parents and relatives. But what exactly is “Respect for the Aged Day”? The following two tabs […]

Read Article

2713575970_3b3a73069b_z

Japanese Summer – A Season of Fireworks and Dance Festivals 1

It’s summer time now in Japan. If you know how hot and sweaty you can be during summer in Japan, then you also know that summer is also the time of fireworks and dance festivals. Almost every night of summer in Japan has fireworks, it may be coming from a small village or a big […]

Read Article

akaoni_agnry

Oni -Part 1- Japanese demon in children’s books

Oni – Japanese demon Typical “Oni” image In Japanese tales, “Oni” is usually a villain. Its standard appearance is quite distinctive; [Skin colour] Mostly red or blue. [Head] Afro like a Belgian footballer Marouane Fellaini who turned into red from blue, with two straight short horns. [Face] Pointed ears like Mr. Spock, thick eyebrows, sharp […]

Read Article

mikan

Gaijin Chronicles : Mikan and Japanese Gift Giving Etiquette

Early autumn of 2012, my friends and I went to Kuroisan Green Park in Setouchi-shi, Okayama for mikan harvesting.  Mikan, according to its Wikipedia entry, is a sweet,  seedless,  and easy-peeling citrus species about the size of mandarin oranges but smaller than an orange. For a fee of 700 yen, we were led to the orchard […]

Read Article

question

Kotoba Asobi: Nazonazo – Learning the Japanese Style of Wordplay 4

Another fun form of Japanese wordplay is nazonazo. And just like the shiritori, it is fun to play with other people. Word Puzzles/Nazonazo Nazonazo is just the Japanese word for riddles. Riddles are design to make your minds work but a riddle in a non-native language will make your mind work harder. It is very […]

Read Article

20141108_122440

Shimanami Kaido : Beyond the cycling routes

At this years company excursion, we traveled down south to Seto Inland Sea. Located in between Imabari, Ehime and Onomichi, Hiroshima. It took us about three hours to reach the port of Shitadami where we boarded a small cruise vessel to experience the Rapid Tides of the Kurushima Strait. Before the cruise started, the cruise […]

Read Article

Sponsored Links

Leave a Reply

Sponsored Links

  • Google+
    InstagramInstagram
PAGE TOP ↑